Contest — Runner-Up

I like this technique a lot, because it uses the defixio itself as a kind of spirit, which is I think quite in keeping with the original way these things were intended.

I’m marking this one as a runner-up, and while I didn’t originally say so I’m going to offer the author of this technique, Travis, a choice of one of my books as well.  Travis, please contact me by email to arrange the delivery of the inscribed book of your choice.

Origami Defixio: Spirit Platform meets Defixio.

One technique of spell work Iv begun to appreciate is the concept of Defixiones as mentioned in Magic Power Language Symbol. The idea is very straightforward and easy to enhance with additional sigils or words written alongside the primary magical purpose.  Personally, I dislike sigils as I have difficulty creating them, and feel inauthentic using premade sigils. Instead, I write or copy a poem I admire and write that on the defixio as an offering to the spiritual identity I write the defixio to. If the practitioner is more comfortable with just “energy” instead of “spirits”, the poem will act as a resonator for its particular energy and the defixio will already carry a familiar quality with the energy the practitioner hopes to bring about.  Another way Iv enhanced my defixiones is by folding the paper into an origami shape. Depending on the tone of the petition or request and to whom I am releasing the defixio to, I can choose different origami forms to fold my defixio into. If I wanted to request the presence of love in my life, I could fold my defixio into a dove, if I desired money, I could fold it into a frog or rabbit (if I can find a pattern online that is). While folding the defixio, I envision the animal as the messenger, and on its wings or in its mouth, the completed defixio will carry my message for me to whatever source I petition. In this way, a small spiritual platform (a golem for others I suppose)  is created out of the defixio. Below is an abbreviated example of a defixio I made after my fathers death.

 

Defixio for Mourning and Healing

Step One: My father was a practical man so I used practical notebook paper. The sheets are thin and there for easy to fold crisply. At the top of the page, I wrote my fathers name with his birth date and the date of his death. Also, I wrote “Dad” since this was the name I most strongly knew him as.

Step Two: After reading through different poems, I selected Elizabeth Bishop’s “One Art”. The poem resonated with my feelings of grief but also spoke to the necessity of coping and dealing with the experience of loss. I put the poem beneath my father’s name.

Step Three: I decided to fold the paper into the shape of a fox for two reasons. Aside from being practical, my father was anything but typical. The idea of folding a dove or crane seemed too boring to the memory of my father. For personal reasons, the idea of a fox seemed to function better. Secondly, foxes are common figures in mythology as creatures that can step between spiritual and physical realms. Thus I decided on the fox.

Step Four: With the defixio folded, I meditated holding the fox in my lap. I dwelled upon my grief and told the fox my pains. I read aloud the poem that was now inside the fox and asked the fox to take my grief with him (Because it seemed right that the fox was indeed a “him”).

Step 5: With the defixio now full of my energy, I went walking looking for a good place to release my fox into the wild. When I found the right place, I simply said a small prayer asking that my message be received and that my little fox go where it needs to go unhindered. I thanked my deity for this expression and released my grief with the fox.

The ritual above can be easily altered for any purpose. If the esteem of your defixio is for protection, use a pattern for an origami bear or whatever other animal you find agreeable that resonates with the concept you are cultivating for your defixio. Poems and origami patterns are readily available through simple google searches.

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