The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Department of Media Relations.

The earliest example of proto-Canaanite is a magical spell to repell snakes. Translation? “Mother snake, mother snake says mucus-mucus.” The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Department of Media Relations.

So I’ve been walking around all day, saying “mother snake, mother snake says mucus-mucus.” I even said it aloud on campus.

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5 Responses to “The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Department of Media Relations.”

  1. mucus mucus, huh? I guess it all depends on the translator. It was translated for my (not by me!) as “Speech of Spittle, Spittle, mother of snake, mother of snake.” But your version is more fun to say.

  2. Since hieroglyphs don’t write vowels, what I imagine you have is something that’s largely a string of roots, and so a lot of translations are possible. I like mucus-mucus, though.

  3. Mucus? Maybe it is ‘saliva’?

    This reminds me of the legend that the serpent Apophis was created from the saliva of the goddess Neith, which might or might not be related to this spell.

  4. http://hebrew-academy.huji.ac.il/PDF/addendum.pdf

    because no discovery can happen without academic mudslinging.

  5. Good comment. It is a pitty that many people doen\’d think like trat. Thanks.

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